Tag Archives: pollinators

Virginia Creeper Sphinx Moth © Andrea White

Take 5: National Moth Week

Moths are one of the most diverse groups of organisms on the planet with scientists estimating there are at least 150,000 species worldwide, a testament to their adaptability, diversity, and success as a group. Their size, coloring, and shapes vary widely, from large, graceful Luna Moths to the sherbet-colored Rosy Maple Moths to the drab but perfectly camouflaged leaf-lookalike Walnut Sphinx Moth.

National Moth Week is celebrated the last full week of July and everyone is invited to observe, enjoy, and even document some of these amazing creatures. Most (but not all) moths are nocturnal, so attracting them can be as simple as leaving an outdoor light on and waiting for your winged guests to arrive.

Enjoy these five photos of moths in honor of National Moth Week and submit your own moth photos to the Picture This: Your Great Outdoors photo contest!

Waved Sphinx Moth © Gary Wise
Waved Sphinx Moth © Gary Wise
Cecropia Moth © Suzette Johnson
Cecropia Moth © Suzette Johnson
Hummingbird Clearwing Moth © Susumu Kishihara
Hummingbird Clearwing Moth © Susumu Kishihara
Luna Moth © Jane Morrisson
Luna Moth © Jane Morrisson
Virginia Creeper Sphinx Moth © Andrea White
Virginia Creeper Sphinx Moth © Andrea White
Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly © Christine St. Andre

Take 5: Beloved Butterflies

What creature so embodies the bright, warm, joyous season of summer quite like the butterfly? Although we typically picture butterflies flitting about in colorful fields of wildflowers—and rightly so!—these fascinating insects live in a broad spectrum of habitats including forests, heathlands, bogs, swamps, even salt marshes—anywhere, in fact, where their caterpillar food plants and sources of nectars for adults are found.

June is National Pollinators Month! Habitat loss, pesticide use, and other factors threaten many of the butterfly species we love and cherish, along with many of our other native pollinators. Learn about creating a pollinator garden and other ways you can help pollinators, including butterflies, on our website.

To honor some of nature’s most colorful and celebrated pollinators, here is a collection of gorgeous butterfly photographs from our annual Picture This: Your Great Outdoors photo contest. The 2019 photo contest is now open, so submit your nature photos today!

Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly © Christine St. Andre
Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly © Christine St. Andre
Baltimore Checkerspot Butterfly © Jessie Fries
Baltimore Checkerspot Butterfly © Jessie Fries
Eastern Comma Butterfly © Lena Mirisola
Eastern Comma Butterfly © Lena Mirisola
Black Swallowtail Butterfly © Mike Lowery
Black Swallowtail Butterfly © Mike Lowery
Painted Lady Butterfly © Sophia Sobel
Painted Lady Butterfly © Sophia Sobel
Dandelions © Mass Audubon

Don’t Ditch the Dandelions!

Before you mow them down or, worse, reach for the herbicide, you might want to consider giving the dandelions in your yard a second chance.

Dandelions © Mass Audubon

How They Got Here

The ubiquitous dandelions that pop up in our yards this time of year are actually native to Europe and Asia. They were brought here by European colonists who used them for medicine, food, and wine. The English name comes from the French “dent de lion” meaning “teeth of a lion” which refers to the jagged leaves.

A Useful Weed

Many people think of them as a noxious weed but they are actually quite a useful plant. They flower earlier than most of our native plants so they offer early pollen and nectar for honeybees and native pollinators.

They are host plants for the caterpillars of several moth species including the spectacular Giant Leopard Moth. Their long tap root helps to break up the soil and move nutrients and water throughout the soil. And dandelion greens are delicious.

Dandelions © Mass Audubon

Go Natural

This year, help out our native pollinators and be kind to Mother Earth by forgoing any herbicides and letting dandelions do their thing. Dandelions are an important food source for honeybees and others throughout the spring and most herbicides are poisonous to these insect pollinators.

Goldenrod © Katharine Randel

Take 5: Glorious Goldenrod

Ah…ah…AH…CHOO! Feeling a bit sneezy these days? Well, we’re here to clear the air—goldenrod is not to blame for your seasonal allergy woes. This bright, ubiquitous, late-flowering plant has been framed by the real culprit, ragweed, which blooms around the same time and often nearby. Ragweed’s light, dusty pollen is easily carried on the wind to hay-feverish noses but goldenrod’s pollen is much too heavy, making the latter all the more appealing for pollinators!

There are at least 15 species of butterfly and moth caterpillars that feed on the leaves and stems of goldenrods and the many species of insects that can be found on goldenrods, pollinating the flowers or feeding on their leaves and nectar, are far too numerous to count! Research from Cornell University suggests that Monarch butterflies actually face their greatest food shortage in the fall as they are migrating south, usually along the coast; so while milkweed is the primary food source for Monarch caterpillars, the adult butterflies rely on nectar from wildflowers such as goldenrod to fuel them on their long journey.

So before you go pulling goldenrods out of your yard or garden as a nuisance weed, give them a second chance. You might just be reward by a visit from some hungry butterflies. Here are five beautiful photos of goldenrod from our Picture This: Your Great Outdoors photo contest entries. The 2018 contest is now closed, but that doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy some gorgeous photography year-round!

Read and print out our By the Numbers: Goldenrod and learn how to plant a native pollinator garden in your backyard on our website.

Tri-colored Bumblebee on Goldenrod © Ellen Pierce

Tri-colored Bumblebee on Goldenrod © Ellen Pierce

Orange Sulphur on Goldenrod © Richard Welch

Orange Sulphur on Goldenrod © Richard Welch

Monarch Butterfly and Goldenrod © Kim Caruso

Monarch Butterfly and Goldenrod © Kim Caruso

Monarch Butterfly on Goldenrod © Karen Lund

Monarch Butterfly on Goldenrod © Karen Lund

Goldenrod © Katharine Randel

Goldenrod © Katharine Randel

Monarch Butterfly © Rachel Bellenoit

Take 5: National Pollinator Week!

June 18–24 is National Pollinator Week and we’re celebrating these wonderful and critical creatures that provide a much needed and under-appreciated service to us and to the natural world. The vast majority of flowering plants on earth need help from pollinators to reproduce; we need pollinators for our food supply and to support healthy ecosystems.

Enjoy these five photos of pollinator butterflies you’re likely to see in Massachusetts and learn what you can do to support pollinators.


Monarch Butterfly © Rachel Bellenoit

Monarch Butterfly © Rachel Bellenoit

 

Eastern Tailed Blue © Nanci St. George

Eastern Tailed Blue © Nanci St. George

 

Baltimore Checkerspot © Brendan Cramphorn

Baltimore Checkerspot © Brendan Cramphorn

 

Black Swallowtail © Amy Dahlberg Chu

Black Swallowtail © Amy Dahlberg Chu

 

Pearl Crescents © Kristin Foresto

Pearl Crescents © Kristin Foresto/Mass Audubon