Drawing Hawks and Falcons from Life – December 2, 2018 from 10 am to 12 pm

Do you love birds of prey? Do you love drawing? Join us on Sunday, December 2, 2018 at the Museum of American Bird Art for our Drawing Hawks and Falcons from Life workshop. Click here to register!

During this class you will be able to see hawks and falcons up close and discover more about these beautiful birds of prey from a Mass Audubon naturalist while you learn to draw them from life with pencil and paper. You will be able to explore methods for developing your sketch, as well as techniques for capturing depth, volume and texture. All skill levels are welcome! Preregistration is required. Suitable for adults and older children.

Nature in a Minute: Cedar Waxwings

As the leaves have dropped to the meadow and forest floor, the beautiful fall color has not migrated from the wildlife sanctuary, but has transformed with color radiating from the birds and fruit that are ever-present in the fall and winter. The bright red berries, from cherries, crabapples, and dogwoods, have been attracting hundreds of birds each day, including cedar waxwings. We have been fortunate to photograph large flocks of waxwings on the sanctuary.

We hope you enjoy these photographs of the Cedar Waxwings from the past two weeks.

Selected artwork from our 3rd annual Taking Flight juried youth bird art exhibition (Part VIII)

We are extremely excited to display a selection of art from our third annual juried youth bird art exhibition. All artwork will appear in this series of posts. This annual exhibition is open to any children and young adults age 4 to 18 years old. All selected entries will be on display at the Museum of American Bird Art from November 10, 2018 to March 30, 2019. Entries for our fourth annual exhibition will open in January 2019 and close in June 2019.

Come see the artwork on display at the Museum of American Bird Art by appointment or during 3 open houses:

January 26, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

February 23, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

March 23, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Caroline Pollan, Age 13

Hummingbirds are one of my favorite birds not only because they are beautiful, but they can fly unlike any other bird. They are incredibly fast despite their size, so fast that I’ve never been able to take a picture of one. That’s why I painted one of these amazing birds – to try to capture the joy of seeing a hummingbird.

Gentoo at Home, Samantha Taylor, Age 9

Gentoo penguins are my favorite bird. I love how they have such bright orange beaks and feet. I think it’s very interesting how the patterns on their feathers change from being grey and black fluffball babies to 24-inch black, white, and orange adults. The dots and shapes around their eyes are especially cool. They also build interesting nests out of grass and rocks, hunt for food in the water, and waddle around with their young as they grow up. I created this particular image of a Gentoo penguin because the baby is on the parent’s feet. It shows a perfect impression of what a Gentoo penguin family might look like while waiting for family time, lunch or dinner. I also like how the landscape changes from stones galore to a sandy beach to a deep blue ocean to a cloudy sky.

Peacock, Lucy Modern, Age 7

I drew a peak because they have beautiful puffy tails.

Selected artwork from our 3rd annual Taking Flight juried youth bird art exhibition (Part VII)

We are extremely excited to display a selection of art from our third annual juried youth bird art exhibition. All artwork will appear in this series of posts. This annual exhibition is open to any children and young adults age 4 to 18 years old. All selected entries will be on display at the Museum of American Bird Art from November 10, 2018 to March 30, 2019. Entries for our fourth annual exhibition will open in January 2019 and close in June 2019.

Come see the artwork on display at the Museum of American Bird Art by appointment or during 3 open houses:

January 26, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

February 23, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

March 23, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

Sparrow Hawk on a Winter’s Day, Anna Rose, Age 17

I took my reference photos for this piece in my backyard while a Cooper’s Hawk was perched atop my bird feeder. I love Cooper’s Hawks because of their gorgeous yellow eyes and extreme agility. Their free spirit and elegant strength easily makes them one of my most favorite birds.

Sandpiper, Maris Van Vlack, Age 16

This is based off of a picture I took at the beach. I really like the patterns of the feathers and the way that the bird camouflages because its feathers are the same color as the sand.

Raven, Claire Grant, Age 15

I always liked drawing animals. Birds were a bit of a challenge but I always liked to draw their anatomy, more specifically, wings. Hence, I drew a raven flying. As to why I chose a raven, I enjoyed the supernatural lore behind them. People usually associate ravens with witchcraft and cunning. They are one of my favorite birds.

Bluejay, Ethan Cross, Age 11

Hummingbird, Ehtan Cross, Age 7

Selected artwork from our 3rd annual Taking Flight juried youth bird art exhibition (Part VI)

We are extremely excited to display a selection of art from our third annual juried youth bird art exhibition. All artwork will appear in this series of posts. This annual exhibition is open to any children and young adults age 4 to 18 years old. All selected entries will be on display at the Museum of American Bird Art from November 10, 2018 to March 30, 2019. Entries for our fourth annual exhibition will open in January 2019 and close in June 2019.

Come see the artwork on display at the Museum of American Bird Art by appointment or during 3 open houses:

January 26, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

February 23, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

Flamingo, Sabrina Puccio, Age 16

I recently started sketching flamingos after finding some old family photos taken at a zoo’s bird exhibit. Flamingos quickly became a new favorite bird of mine to draw, which is why I decided to enter this piece.

Northern Mockingbirds, Iris Rosenhagen, Age 13

A famous bird, Lady Bird Johnson, once said, “Encourage & support your kids because children are apt to live up to what you believe of them.” Every year, I watch our neighborhood family of mockingbirds raise their young. What stands out most in my mind about Northern Mockingbirds are what remarkable parents they are. Because the fledglings are brought up with so much care, generation after generation grows up to be such supportive parents themselves. The mockingbird parents are protective, nurturing, and they belive in their kids. I’m grateful that my own parents share these values. But I think I’m even more grateful that my parents don’t regurgitate bugs into my mouth. In all seriousness, I like to consider Northern Mockingbirds a symbol of how every parent should be.

Owl Dreaming, Kai Choat, Age 7

Owls are nocturnal, beautiful and mysterious birds.

Cockatiel Perching, Lilia MustopaAge 6

Cockatiels are one of my favorite birds because of their red blush. It is a cockatiel in a pine tree and it is almost night time. I cut the bird out because I didn’t like one of my bird drawings and this one is nicer. There is a pink flower and it has falling out of a tree. For the background, I blended the colors and used salt.

Resting Seagull, Isaiah HuntAge 6

I love going to the beach and running with the seagulls. When I heard of the art contest I thought they were the perfect bird to draw.

Selected artwork from our 3rd annual Taking Flight juried youth bird art exhibition (Part V)

We are extremely excited to display a selection of art from our third annual juried youth bird art exhibition. All artwork will appear in this series of posts. This annual exhibition is open to any children and young adults age 4 to 18 years old. All selected entries will be on display at the Museum of American Bird Art from November 10, 2018 to March 30, 2019. Entries for our fourth annual exhibition will open in January 2019 and close in June 2019.

Come see the artwork on display at the Museum of American Bird Art by appointment or during 3 open houses:

January 26, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

February 23, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

Golden Eagle, Cayla Rosenhagen, Age 13

Through the eyes of a Golden Eagle, the world looks very different. In an age of ever increasing industrialization and reliance on technology, the human eye is often transfixed to a screen. The eagle eye is unencumbered by such trivial notions. They live a simple life, not one without challenges, but one of freedom and soaring to great heights. In their view, mountains reach high into azure skies and crystal-clear streams cascade through forests. Literally and metaphorically, the vision of the Golden Eagle is far more favorable than that of humans. Take the time to look away from those electronic devices. Be among nature. Try to see more of what the eagle eye sees.

Surprised by a Chat, Joel Eckerson, Age 15

One of my favorite moments while birding was in the dead of winter. I was sitting in front of a desolate thicket, when out of nowhere a bright yellow cheery Chat popped up and gave me unforgettable views. A Chat is cool to see in the Summer but in the Winter the colors just pop and it will change your day in the flick of a switch.

Peacock, Amelie Hunt, Age 5

I love all the colors of a peacock. They have some shine so I added a little glitter to add to the design of their pretty feathers.

Eagle Taking Flight, Martin King, Age 7

This is a drawing of a bald eagle. The bald eagle is an American symbol. I like bald eagles because they are beautiful birds. They have dark feathers on their body and white feathers on their head. I have seen pictures of bald eagles in books and on the computer, and I have seen live ones in the zoo. In this drawing, a bald eagle is taking flight.

Selected artwork from our 3rd annual Taking Flight juried youth bird art exhibition (Part IV)

We are extremely excited to display a selection of art from our third annual juried youth bird art exhibition. All artwork will appear in this series of posts. This annual exhibition is open to any children and young adults age 4 to 18 years old. All selected entries will be on display at the Museum of American Bird Art from November 10, 2018 to March 30, 2019. Entries for our fourth annual exhibition will open in January 2019 and close in June 2019.

Come see the artwork on display at the Museum of American Bird Art by appointment or during 3 open houses:

January 26, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

February 23, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

Shoebill Stork, Mackenzie Casto, Age 12

I think the Shoebill Stork ties into the theme of favorite birds because it is one of the most unique birds alive today. It is also one of the birds that many people do not know exist. A quick look at the Shoebill Stork will make you think you are in the Jurassic time period because it looks prehistoric and that why it is one of my favorite birds!

The Cranes, Elizabeth Guan, Age 9

It’s about cranes enjoying the Spring, back from migration.

Mouse Watch Out, Luca Nielsen, Age 10

This winter, I visited my grandparents in Germany. They live in an area where you can see many birds of prey and found this picture in a book, so I it.

Selected artwork from our 3rd annual Taking Flight juried youth bird art exhibition (Part III)

We are extremely excited to display a selection of art from our third annual juried youth bird art exhibition. All artwork will appear in this series of posts. This annual exhibition is open to any children and young adults age 4 to 18 years old. All selected entries will be on display at the Museum of American Bird Art from November 10, 2018 to March 30, 2019. Entries for our fourth annual exhibition will open in January 2019 and close in June 2019.

Come see the artwork on display at the Museum of American Bird Art by appointment or during 3 open houses:

January 26, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

February 23, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

March 23, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

Chickadee, Tyler Winston, Age 12

I choose the Chickadee because of its beauty and the feathers on its head make it look like a hat! Its call is unique. The Chickadee’s feathers look so soft and delicate. I think their tail feathers are very pretty. Some think the Chickadee is a plain bird but I think it’s beautiful!

American Krestrel, Carolyn Doremus, Age 18

I find American kestrels to be an interesting bird of prey. They are very cute looking and the colors on them are simply beautiful. Falcons are among my favorite birds because of their fascinating design and behavior. I drew this kestrel in a place that it might commonly be seen.

Geoffrey, Sean Greene, Age 10

I tried to paint the puffin to show that he is alive – do you see the sparkle in his eye? This is my favorite bird because his beak is different than other birds.

Puffin, Axel Sandford, Age 9

 

Selected artwork from our 3rd annual Taking Flight juried youth bird art exhibition (Part II)

We are extremely excited to display a selection of art from our third annual juried youth bird art exhibition. All artwork will appear in this series of posts. This annual exhibition is open to any children and young adults age 4 to 18 years old. All selected entries will be on display at the Museum of American Bird Art from November 10, 2018 to March 30, 2019. Entries for our fourth annual exhibition will open in January 2019 and close in June 2019.

Come see the works on display at the Museum of American Bird Art by appointment or during 3 open houses

January 26, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

February 23, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

March 23, 2019 from 12 to 2 pm

Rosy-faced Lovebirds, Kendall Winston, Age 13

When I first saw a picture of these Rosy-Faced Lovebirds I thought “how beautiful!” I just love how the picture was taken and I knew I wanted to make it my own and turn it into a piece of art. This is a very social bird that generally lives in southwestern Africa. They live to be about 15 years old and they grow to be about 7 inches tall. I loved learning about this beautiful bird!

After the Rain, London Peterson, Age 14

I love birds with personality, and I think that the house sparrow has some of the most character of any bird. It is a numerous, everyday bird that is often overlooked, but if time is taken to study the house sparrow, many interesting things can be discovered about its behavior. I have spent many delightful hours watching the house sparrow. It is such a common bird that I don’t even have to go out of my backyard to see it. In my painting, I wanted to show the beauty of this unique bird, one of my favorites in the bird family.

Golden Pheasant, Study No. 3, Kaiya Smits, Age 8

I like the Golden Pheasant because it is such a colorful and pretty bird. The Golden Pheasant can be found in China. Boy Golden Pheasants are colorful to attract girl Golden Pheasants. They are terrible at flying. But good at running. They eat tiny reptiles, seeds, and grubs.

The Swordfish Bird with Salmon Flowers,
Antonio Cortez Marques, Age 14

This swordfish bird comes from my imagination. I love bright colours, therefore I chose a mixture of colours which is somewhat unreal. I always liked attracting birds and animals. Usually, I like birds with long crests.